July 4, 2015

Geospace Air Archer Review

I've come across the Geospace foam rockets at various supermarkets, including Kroger. This display, however, caught my eye, since it involved more than just a push-pull launching tube. So I picked one up for $15. For science!


The Air Archer claims up to 150' ranges - a dubious claim, especially for a novelty toy company. I couldn't get anywhere near those ranges. But if you're in the mood for some fun with an oddball blaster, don't completely discount the Air Archer.


Out of the package, the Air Archer is obvious in operation. You slide an arrow over the barrel, or put one of the included suction darts in the end. You then pull back, aim, and let go! The bungee is what provides the power, so you're fine holding onto one of the bow arms.

Several problems emerge, however. The rockets fit SUPER tight on the barrel (5/8" OD exactly), to the point where it takes a while to put them on. The suction darts, meanwhile, sit loosely in the end of the barrel. Respective average angled ranges were 70' and 30'. Slightly looser rockets might perform better.


The real value, as it turns out, is in the Air Archer's ability to load any kind of streamlined dart. The inside of the barrel has a loose airgun fit on darts, is 10" long, and has a ridge at the base which acts as a dart stop. For those familiar with NIC parlance, the 10" draw and large plunger tube results in low pressure, but high airflow. Similar to that of a HAMP. As such, I could easily lob streamline darts from multiple brands 100' or more.


I will not be modding this blaster at this time, but I figured I could show how to disassemble it. Plastic rivets hold the various plastic rings and pieces. Careful application of a small screwdriver can pop the rivets loose.


The seal on the blaster is in the form of a foam ring riding inside the plunger tube. In case you hadn't already figured out, this is a reverse plunger system.


Fully disassembled, you can see the massive amount of dead space within this blaster. If you filled it in, or (better yet) simply removed the existing system and slapped on a new plunger and tube (in the style of a Nerf Bow and Arrow), I imagine those 150' range claims would be more than possible with darts.

Overall, the Air Archer is your typical bow and arrow type blaster. While the range claims are outrageous with the accompanying ammunition, it can be a fun blaster for throwing darts long distances. Just don't expect anything but substantial modification to make this into a war-worthy blaster. Grab one if you're interested in a DIY project, but otherwise you can live without it.

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